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Southern Daily Echo NHS campaign raises more than £100,000

Posted on: April 15, 2020 by Mariella Brown

An NHS campaign backed by the Southern Daily Echo in Southampton has raised more than £100,000.

Southampton Hospitals Charity (SHC) launched its appeal in March to support the mental and physical wellbeing of the staff at University Hospital Southampton (UHS) while they tackle the COVID-19 virus.

The appeal is supported by the Echo which revealed that a total of £100,000 has already been raised by the public to enable organisers to fund wellness packages with hand creams, food supplies and mental health support information.

Joint Interim Director of SHC, Jeneen Thomsen said, “In just a few weeks, we’ve raised £100 000 and the response from the local community has been absolutely incredible.

“The donations will support not only those who are treating patients with COVID-19 but also those working across the hospital who have had to rapidly adjust their ways of working, to both protect the health of vulnerable patients, and to clear vital bed space in anticipation of a spike in COVID-19 patients requiring critical care.”

The Charity will also be supporting specialist psychological support for staff, both now and into the future.

The Daily Echo backed the campaign as part of the Daily Echo #ThereWithYou to support residents and commit to shine a light on unsung heroes in our community.

To donate visit www.southamptonhospitalscharity.org/NHSheroes or text NHSHEROES 3 to 70460 to donate £3; NHSHEROES 5 to 70460 to donate £5; NHSHEROES 10 to 70460 to donate £10.


Camden New Journal praises local councils for maintaining advertising spend

The Camden New Journal has praised local councils for maintaining advertising spend despite the Coronavirus pandemic hitting the UK.

Last week’s paper carried four full pages of advertising from Camden council.

But while thanking the authorities for their support, the paper took a swipe at other publishers who have appealed for public donations.

In a front-page leader, the paper said: “We put the public first, and we can’t do that by removing journalists from the task.

“But we, too, have lost a lot of advertising, just like every other newspaper. At the moment, we are keeping our staff and paying their wages. It’s the honourable thing to do.

“In the meantime, the local authorities our reporters cover, in Camden, Islington and Westminster, have turned up magnificently to help us by continuing to advertise in our pages.

“It is, in effect, an act of social solidarity for which they can be proud.

“Private publishers are entitled to appeal to the public for donations but surely only if they are willing to open their books, that is accounts, to the public for easy inspection.

“In the meantime, we thank our local councils.

“In the past, we have not shied away from criticising them when this was required.

“But they accepted the rigours of press freedom which is the engine on which society turns.

“For this, we are grateful — and to our readers for recognising who we are: publishers for the people.

“We were set up in 1982, following an industrial dispute, simple to serve the community. We are doing our best to honour that pledge with integrity.”

The CNJ also publishes the Islington Tribune and Westminster Extra titles.